How to Nail a Job Interview


Many people struggle with job interviews. The pressure of having to "just be yourself"  while having to impress the person in front of you is difficult to balance.

A hiring manager told us that most interviewers want their interviews to go well because it helps the company move forward  and deal with other internal matters.While it’s in their best interest to find the ideal prospect immediately, they still need to maintain their high standards. That is why only those few candidates who really ace the interview process make it.

We want to help you make a solid first impression and get you in the best position to secure that dream job.

Talent and Culture

What most companies typically look for in a candidate are two traits— talent and culture fit.

Talent here refers to a combination of work ethic, experience, and skills—not necessarily innate abilities.

Managers want employees who will make company life easier. At the very least, you need to show that you possess the skills and experience required for the position. This bit is obvious but still, make sure you have this box ticked.

Once you’re confident that you’ve got the first side of the formula down, focus on familiarizing and even embodying the company’s culture.

For starters, read their mission & vision statement then work your way down to whatever content they released.

When the day comes, show that you not only have the chops but also the personality that coincides with what they believe in.

Master your nerves

Everyone gets nervous before an interview, but those who stand out are the ones who rise above the uneasiness. The last impression you want to give is that you easily cave to pressure.

On the day of the interview, go about your normal routine. Arrive at the interview venue ten minutes early. In the few minutes you have before the interview, do some deep breathing exercises. Once it happens, maintain eye contact, relax but be alert and speak with conviction.

Demonstrate your value

The company will be investing money in you—show that you’re a problem solver, that you can fill up the newly vacant position from the get-go. Think about challenges the organization is facing and show how you’ll be able to help solve them. You may even choose to present a plan of what you’ll do once you’re hired and share it with the hiring officer after an interview to show your willingness to immediately contribute to the team.

But if things don’t go your way...

It won't be the end of the world. Your job search continues. Opportunity comes in different forms, and the most common form is in rejection, and as we mentioned earlier, rise above it.

The hiring process truly is tedious work, especially with a large company. They’ll want the best of the best. Try to think about it in terms of not leaving the decision up to the hiring manager. Make it a no-brainer. Show that you’re a cut above the rest in terms of talent as well as someone who embodies the culture.

You’ll significantly increase the odds of getting hired.

 

 


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